Summer Tattoo Care

Summer Tattoo Care

Jun 30, 2021 | brookline agency

The topic of summer tattoo care is an important one because in several ways, summer is the riskiest time for those people getting a new tattoo. It is even important for those who’ve had tattoos for years, to understand the risks summer has on your favorite ink. Why is it that summer tattoo care is different from care at any other time of the year? Several reasons: Modern woman applying sun cream for sun ray protection while relaxing at deck chair near pool side

Sun Exposure

Unless you live in a climate that’s 72 degrees all year, you likely get more sun exposure in the summer compared to any other time of year. Of course we all know the dangers of too much sun exposure to our skin in general, but this is even more relevant when you have a tattoo. The “dangerous” sun rays we are warned about are called UV rays. There are 2 types of UV rays, and both of them are problematic. UVA rays are able to penetrate deep into the layers of your skin. This is particularly important to understand if you have a tattoo, because your tattoo is not in the most shallow layer of skin. It is deeper (and this is the reason that a tattoo is permanent), and UVA rays are easily able to reach the location of your tattoo. UVA rays are able to slowly break down the ink in your tattoo. When ink is broken into small enough pieces, your body’s immune system ensures those pieces get absorbed into the body. This is a primary cause of fading and blurring tattoos. A single day in the sun is not going to cause a tattoo to fade from UVA rays, but prolonged exposure over time can certainly have visible effects. That’s why summer tattoo care is so important. In addition to UVA rays, the sun gives off UVB rays. These rays do not penetrate your skin deeply, the way UVA rays do. Instead, UVB rays are the ones that cause sunburn. Sunburn is not good for anyone, but is especially bad for a tattoo. The damage from UVB rays can cause notable fading over time, especially if you get repeated sunburns. One of the most important parts of summer tattoo care is to use sunscreen that protects your skin. Tattooed Woman Farming

Dry Skin

Because we have more skin exposed to the elements in the summer, it’s easy for our skin to get dry. Often we think of winter as the biggest danger for dry skin, but it’s a key concern in the summer too. In addition to being exposed to more sun, our skin is less protected from the wind by clothes, exposed to chlorine in pools, or damaged by harsh salt water. Dry skin is more of a concern for new tattoos as opposed to older ones, but moisturizing can be good for all skin. If you have a new tattoo, be especially vigilant about summer tattoo care that includes the right moisturizer.

Pool Time

If you are well past the healing stage for your tattoo, a dip in the pool is fine. But if your tattoo is new, you want to make sure you stay out of the pool, ocean, bathtub, and any other body of water. It is essential to avoid prolonged water exposure for a new tattoo, and in the summer this can be hard. If you’re planning a beach vacation or want to have a lot of pool time, consider waiting until the winter to get a tattoo. Or, make sure to use our HUSH CBD Foam Soap after your day at the beach, or splash in the pool, to make sure your tattoo is fully cleansed and cared for. When you first get a tattoo, it can be so tempting to want to show everyone. If you get your tattoo in the summer, displaying your ink is even easier because of the lighter outfits people wear. For those who’ve had tattoos for years, go ahead and enjoy the summer exposure with your tattoos. But for those who’ve just gotten a tattoo, be extra careful in the summer. Summer tattoo care means the right SPF (even for older tattoos!), avoiding the pool, and keeping your skin moisturized. One way to ensure a new summer tattoo heals well is to use the right tattoo aftercare products. HUSH’s CBD foaming soap is one of the best choices for a healing tattoo, and will remove any surface bacteria after any fun summer activity.